Tea, 2.

When I wrote the post Tea, I clean forgot another very important aspect of how we drink our tea. Nick reminded me of it and here is how it is done.

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12 Responses to Tea, 2.

  1. nick says:

    Very good. In the UK though, it’s traditionally manual workers who drink their tea from the saucer. Or they used to. Probably that’s now a thing of the past.
    nick recently posted..The blockade

    • Here it is almost an art form to drink like that Nick. It is also fairly common to share one cup of tea with a friend and the buyer usually will take the cup and offer half in the saucer to the friend. It will be an insult not to accept.

  2. shackman says:

    I’ve never understood that one.

  3. My grandmother sometimes drank her tea that way. It cooled it off.
    Cheerful Monk recently posted..You Have to Be Kidding

    • Yes, one of the reasons for drinking that way is to cool the beverage down enough to have a quick drink. t is also fairly common to share one cup of tea with a friend and the buyer usually will take the cup and offer half in the saucer to the friend. It will be an insult not to accept.

  4. kylie says:

    My grandmother used to give me half her cup of tea in the saucer, just like that!

    I just saw your earlier post on tea and I like the look of the kullar. It is very tactile.
    kylie recently posted..Sandwiches

    • I intend writing about how we were brought up to drink in vessels other than cups and / or saucers. You are very perseptive. Kullars are classic vessels to be discarded once used to become clay again for recycling. They are very comfortable in one’s hands and retain the heat of the beverage longer. Sadly, they are disappearing and are being replaced by flimsy plastic or paper cups.

  5. are culture and traditions – are always intriguing. I think the main reason for the “sipping saucer” was the art of cooling it down. Or as someone has said “giving someone a taste” like a child who might be begging to try it and it will be easier for the adult to tip a bit into the saucer.

    We could chat about vessels for these hot drinks…I remember when it was always in the work force an enamel mug which seems also to have it roots in “liquid size – unbreakable – and so forth…”

  6. tammy j says:

    I love cultural differences! had I known as a child it would have been good ammunition for a retort! we were never allowed to ‘slurp’ or make any noise when eating or drinking. no gulping or slurping or chewing noisily. and never with your mouth open! lol!
    which probably isn’t done in India either except for the slurping sound.
    I’ve heard it’s a custom in Asia and is a compliment to the host or cook to make a satisfied sound. if I’d known this then I could have said… “I’m moving to INDIA where they know how to enjoy their food and beverages!” and then I would be sent to my room for talking back. Hahahahaha! SH Sean.
    tammy j recently posted..bunny exercise and Irish luck

    • In my childhood, I too went through training to eat with my mouth closed and not to chomp loudly as well as not to slurp etc. Cups and saucers came into our lives much later. I intend writing about the vessels that we used to drink.

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